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  A ring is one of the major tokens of love - given at engagements, weddings or just as a gift - and has been regarded so for centuries. From the medieval era onwards special rings called posy rings were given to lovers and sometimes friends to express affection. They remained popular in England and France until the 17th century. They are usually engraved with a message of love inside a golden, or gilt,  band. The name posy (or posey) is from the word for poetry, or in French poésie. These messages are carved on the inside and remained concealed...
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in The Collection 1945
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One hundred years on from the armistice that ended it all, this week the museum proudly opened its new exhibition, ‘Erewash Remembers: 100 Years of Commemorating the First World War’. Curated by Kate Crossley-Halls, the exhibition turns not only to the conflict itself but also to its devastating aftermath and the cultures of remembrance that grew out of unthinkable international catastrophe. Global war had very local ramifications, and in towns like Ilkeston huge labour shortages were caused when men went away to the Front, many of which were filled by women. Following the armistice of November 11th, 1918, the struggles were...
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Erewash Museum is currently undertaking conservation work on the Margaret Hope Robinson letters – an archive of more than 2,000 letters that give an emotional insight into the lives of families of British prisoners of war (POWs) during the Second World War.   In 1944, Margaret Hope Robinson was a 29-year-old deputy registrar at Ilkeston Registry Office and was desperate for news of her husband Paul Maltby Robinson, a Major with the Sherwood Foresters, who had been captured by the Japanese forces a few years earlier.   She broke Whitehall regulations to interview two repatriated former POWs and produced a pamphlet...
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in The Collection 1834
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Coal was one of the main reasons Britain’s industries developed quicker than any others’ during the Industrial Revolution. At coal mining’s peak in 1913, this industry consisted of about 2600 mines, producing 287 million tons of coal per year and employing a million people. The history of Erewash and surrounding areas is tied to coal to an extent easy to under-estimate today. Mining communities in the area were tight-knit: many collieries had their own sports teams, and miner’s brass bands were common. The Ilkeston Miner’s Welfare club opened in 1924, standing on the corner of Bristol Road and Manners Road; offering...
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in The Collection 3809
here is a blog written by one of our young volunteers Aiden reviewing our recent Heritage Day, we hope you enjoy it! In the museum we had several organisations come in to explain what they do. This included - The Local History Society, Portable Antiques Scheme and Friends of the Museum group. Firstly, I spoke with the local history society that came in to support the museum on the society’s 50th anniversary. This society hold information about the history of the museum and other local areas. They produce books about which are sold worldwide. They do this because they want to...
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in The Collection 3238