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losing lace upload
Victoria’s successful project ‘Losing lace’ supported by the Arts Council England focussed on the Lace industry in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire and Victoria’s family connection to it. Victoria’s Great Grandfather Thomas Stocks started the lace making business in Jardines factory, Draycott in the early 1900s. The business later merged with Birkin and Company, Nottingham’s largest lace business. She carried out research, visiting old factory sites, gathering artefacts and interviewing people connected to the industry. Victoria produced large vibrant paintings inspired by old lace patterns and a lace installation using artefacts collected during the research. Her aim was to celebrate the success of...
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Here at Erewash Museum we thought it important to mark International Women’s Day (IWD) even though it came at an extremely busy time for us as we are preparing for Old Stables at Dalby House launch. Planning began a few months ago at a staff meeting and we came up with a few ideas and the project evolved and will continue evolving into 2017. As Dalby House was a former residence we asked some of our volunteers to help research the important women associated with the building Erewash Museum occupies. We soon found out that although we have extensive files relating...
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Changing times at Dalby House… From the time it was built until the end of the Second World War, Dalby House had been a private house where women were wives, mothers, daughters or servants of the influential men of the house. Censuses from the time do not list women’s occupations, only those of the men, unless those women are servants. But, as society changed, so did the position and influence of women. The status and use of Dalby House would change forever, as would the influence of women on the property and its uses. In 1946, Dalby House was up for...
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A Victorian Maid at Dalby House Throughout its history as a private family residence, Dalby House would have been looked after by a team of servants. Dalby House was quitea small house compared to some of the stately homes in the country but wouldstill have employed domestic servants such as housemaids, a cook, stableboys, grooms, gardeners etc. Until the twentieth century, domestic service was one of themost common occupations for working women. Girls often became maids as young asten years old. Usually, they would start as a Scullery Maid, doing the worstjobs in the house such as emptying and scrubbing chamber...
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International Women's Day- blog written by our museum volunteer Jeff I was asked to write something about why I, as a man, was supporting International Women’s Day. I found this quite hard to put into words at first, so I had a look at the United Nations web site for some inspiration. The hash tag being used for International Women’s Day is #PledgeForParity. Parity is defined in the dictionary as “equality, as in amount, status, or character.” The motto the United Nations is also using for IWD is “Planet 50-50 by 2030: Step It Up for Gender Equality” Looking at both of...
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